Sparkling rosé aims to cut through in crowded wine market

Rosé table wines have been all the rage for two or three seasons now, while Australia's cool-climate sparkling wines are acclaimed as being among the best in the world.


Why, then, have sparkling rosé wines not yet made a major breakthrough with consumers? 

De Bortoli Wines’ rosé aficionados Leanne De Bortoli and Steve Webber have long aspired to create a sparkling rosé after enjoying some "posh Laurent Perrier Grand Cuvee Rosé" many years ago, saying it was the best they’ve had. 

The Yarra Valley couple believe they’ve cracked the holy grail with their new pale, dry La Bohème NV Cuvée Rosé. 

Inspired by Australia’s growing love affair with all things pink, La Bohème Cuvée Rosé is a new addition to De Bortoli Wines’ popular La Bohème range. 

This very approachable rosé bubbly is kept pale and dry (just 8 grams per litre of residual sugar) and is blended in batches or cuvées using vintage and reserve wines. 

Chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier, the three classic Champagne grapes, are all part of the blend. 

This blend is made up of 45% 2016, 2017 and 2018 vintage wines to which 55% reserve wine dating back to 2010 was added. Its varietal composition is 80% chardonnay, 15% pinot noir and 5% pinot meunier. 

The wine costs $22 a bottle and my wife is just finishing off our sample bottle as I write. None at all left for the neighbours. 

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