A swish new cellar door in the Barossa


The first Kalleske family members arrived in the Barossa Valley in 1847 and various branches have been involved in grape growing and the wine industry ever since.

John and Barbara Kalleske purchased land and vineyards near Atze’s Corner in 1975 and have been developing vineyards in Ebenezer and Koonunga Hills since then.

The oldest vines on the current estate date back to 1912 on what was previously the Atze family property.

In 2005, Andrew Kalleske - the current vigneron - produced their first batch of shiraz called Eddie's Old Vine.

Atze’s Corner now also produces wine from mataro, graciano, petite syrah/durif, montepulciano, grenache, cabernet sauvignon and vermentino.

Now, in a plus for visitors to the Barossa, Atze's Corner wines can be sampled in an architecturally-designed space that has undergone a remarkable transformation from a mezzanine floor to a sleek cellar door with offers views over the valley.


Think rustic charm with copper, marble and timber fittings, as well as leather seating.

“We wanted our cellar door to maximise the views, especially at sunset," says Andrew Kalleske. "The result is a balcony that points towards the sun as it sets down the valley and overlooks our old vineyards.

"With our wines gaining considerable recognition, we wanted to offer visitors a true wine experience. This spectacular setting provides a symbiotic connection with the vineyards and the winery. By staying open later, this also means we will be the last stop for many on their visit to the Barossa.

“We are open until after sunset so when all of the other cellar doors are closing, ours provides another option.

“People can buy a glass of wine and a platter made from local produce and sit on the balcony overlooking the original old 1912 vineyard while the sun descends over the valley.”

Atze’s Corner is at 415 Research Road, Nuriooptpa and is open Friday and Saturday 1pm-sunset and Sundays and public holidays noon-5.30pm. 

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